Month: April 2017

A Fitting End For Both

Posted by – April 30, 2017

December 6, 1886
A FITTING END FOR BOTH.
A Gambler Shoots the Woman Who Cast Him Off and Then Himself.


WASHINGTON, Dec. 6.—A double tragedy occurred to-night in the “Division,” a disreputable part of the city, which, by reason of the prominence in their respective lines of the parties concerned, created quite a little excitement among certain of Washington’s inhabitants. About eighteen months ago John Rowe, a gambler of New York City, came to Washington with a full pocket book. He was accompanied by Minnie Raymond, his mistress, whom he soon established as proprietress of a bagnio south of the avenue. About six months ago he encountered a streak of bad luck and lost all his money. He was discarded by his paramour in favor of another man, said to be the son of a prominent dry goods merchant.

Rowe went on to the house and asked her for money. On being refused, he upbraided her for her ingratitude, and was ejected from the house by the police. He threatened the woman’s life at the time. Luck still ran against him, and to-night, mad with jealousy and his reduced circumstances, he went to the dive and shot the woman through the head immediately on seeing her. He then shot himself through the head causing almost instant death. The woman is still alive, but will probably die. 

From the Collection of The Comtesse DeSpair
The 1886 Morbid Scrapbook

The Starving Anarchist.

Posted by – April 23, 2017

December 8, 1886
THE STARVING ANARCHIST.
Jansen Placed in an Asylum for the Insane and Forced to Take Food.



CHICAGO, Dec. 8—Henry Jansen, the wife-murderer, was transferred from the jail proper to the insane ward yesterday and his fast, which had continued for some days, was abruptly broken off. He was very weak from lack of nourishment, and could not have survived his course of abstinence many days longer. Superintendent Kiley determined to compel the man to take food, and to that end he prepared a very palatable concoction of brandy, sugar, milk, and eggs. As was expected, Jansen refused to take it. A muscular attendant pinioned the patient, and his clinched teeth were pried apart with a spoon. A spoonful of the mixture was poured into his mouth, and as he spattered and spat in an effort to eject it, a clasp was put down on his nose and as he gasped for breath, down went the life-giving fluid. In this painful fashion, while he writhed and roared between breaths, Jansen was compelled to swallow a gill of the fluid. Twice, later in the day, his heroically-administered meal was given him. His strength rapidly grew, although this improvement put him in an ugly frame of mind, and he denounced his saviors in the most bitter terms.

From the Collection of The Comtesse DeSpair
The 1886 Morbid Scrapbook

Shot Him While Asleep.

Posted by – April 23, 2017

December 7, 1886
SHOT HIM WHILE ASLEEP.
A Buffalo Woman Sends a Bullet Through Her Husband’s Heart.


BUFFALO, N. Y., Dec. 7A deliberate and cold-blooded murder was committed in this city at an early hour this morning. At about eight o’clock a boy rushed into No. 8 police station and stated that a man had been shot by his wife in rooms occupied by Emil Penseyres and his wife in the Miller block. Officers immediately proceeded to the place. They were met by a woman who appeared to be in a high state of excitement. She said her husband was in a bedroom , the door of which stood partly open. A cloth had been nailed up over the window. In the bed lay the body of Emil Penseyres. A bullet had penetrated his heart. The shooting occurred at about 6 A.M., according to the best reports, and the man was evidently lying asleep in bed when the murderess fired the fatal shot.

 There were no evidences of a struggle and every indication was that the woman deliberately shot the man in his sleep. The discovery of her terrible deed seemed to drive her into a frenzy of rage. The pistol she had used had been thrown under the bed, and she managed to regain possession of it before the officers were aware of her purpose. She flourished the revolver in the faces of the officers and screamed that she would never be arrested. They rushed at the furious woman and felled her to the floor, and after a severe struggle succeeded in getting the revolver away from her. She still resisted, but in vain, and was informed that she was under arrest and must go to the station-house.
 
She gave her name as Hattie F. Penseyeres, and her age as thirty-three years. Her occupation, she said, was that of a housekeeper. The only remark she made on the way to the station was that her husband “never used her right.” He was some years her junior, and was a wood-worker by trade. It appears that he married the woman who took his life in February, 1885. They had no children, but the woman has a son and daughter by a former marriage. It is said that her reputation was not good, and that she was formerly an inmate of a house of ill-fame.
From the Collection of The Comtesse DeSpair
The 1886 Morbid Scrapbook